November 13-15, 2018

Boston, MA, USA

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Workshop A
Tuesday 13th November

09.00am - 12.00pm
Explore the Safety Risks of Meningococcal Disease as a Result of Complement Inhibition
Workshop Leader: Dan Granoff, Clarox Endowed Chair and Director, Center for Immunobiology and Vaccine Development, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute Workshop Leader: Sanjay Ram, Professor of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School

 

As more complement trials move into late stage clinical development, it is important to acknowledge and discuss the safety risks that are hindering complement therapeutics. This session will explore clinical data to address the risk of contracting meningococcal disease as a result of complement inhibition and ways to manage and mitigate this risk effectively.

Attendees will explore:

  • Complement interactions with the pathogenic Neisseriae
  • Invasive Neisseria infections in patients treated with eculizumab (Soliris®)
  • Meningococcal vaccination in patients treated with therapeutic inhibitors of complement

Dan Granoff, Clarox Endowed Chair and Director, Center for Immunobiology and Vaccine Development, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute

Dan M. Granoff, M.D., holds the Clorox Endowed Chair and is Director of the Center for Immunobiology and Vaccine Development at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland, California. Author of more than 220 articles in infectious diseases, microbiology and vaccine research, his work over the last decade has focused on meningococcal Factor H binding protein, which is now part of two licensed vaccines, and the effect of complement inhibitors on immunity to meningococcal disease. In 2014 he was the recipient of the Maurice Hilleman/Merck Laureate award by the American Society of Microbiology for outstanding contributions to vaccine discovery and development.

Sanjay Ram, Professor of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Sanjay Ram is currently a Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. His group has a long-standing interest in studying how the pathogenic Neisseriae (Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis) interact with the complement system and escape killing by complement. This knowledge is now being used to design novel immunotherapeutics and vaccines against multidrug-resistant gonorrhea that has spread globally.

Workshop B
Tuesday 13th November

13.00pm - 16:00pm
Circulating Extracellular Vesicles of Neuronal and Astrocytic Origin: Carriers of Complement Biomarkers and Effectors in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis
Workshop Leader: Dimitrios Kapogiannis, Clinical Investigator, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

 

The complement system has an important role in normal brain development however can also be implicated in neurological diseases following unanticipated activity, usually in the form of driving
inflammation to exacerbate the disease. This workshop explores the roles of biomarkers in neurodegenerative diseases and gives a brief introduction to extracellular vesicle biogenesis, morphology and functional significance.

Attendees will learn:

  • Methodology for isolating extracellular vesicles of neuronal and astrocytic origin from the circulation
  • Current findings of biomarker discovery and validation studies for Alzheimer’s disease, with emphasis in complement and inflammation
  • How extracellular vesicle biomarkers can assist in therapeutic discovery for neurodegenerative diseases (patient selection, outcomes)
  • Recent findings suggesting that circulating extracellular vesicles may have complement-mediated

Dimitrios Kapogiannis, Clinical Investigator, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Dimitrios Kapogiannis graduated from the University of Athens Medical School. He completed his training in Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School and Behavioral Neurology at NINDS/NIH. He is Clinical Investigator at the Laboratory of Neurosciences at NIA/NIH conducting translational studies in Alzheimer’s disease and adjunct Associate Professor at the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University. His research focus is on Extracellular Vesicles as a source of biomarkers and as effectors in neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. He also conducts clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease targeting brain metabolism.